Facts & Statistics

  • The number of American adults age 65 and older will nearly double over the next 20 years. Of these, more than 90% want to continue living in their own residences as long as possible, and 80% believe that their current residence is where they will always live.

    Source: AARP Study

  • Over one in every eight, or 12.9%, of the population is an older American, 65 years or older.

    Source: Administration on Aging

  • People 65+ represented 12.4% of the population in the year 2000 but are expected to grow to be 19% of the population by 2030. The information in this section of the AoA website brings together a wide variety of statistical information about this growing population.

    Source: Administration on Aging

  • The older population–persons 65 years or older–numbered 39.6 million in 2009 (the latest year for which data is available). They represented 12.9% of the U.S. population, about one in every eight Americans. By 2030, there will be about 72.1 million older persons, more than twice their number in 2000.

    Source: Administration on Aging

  • There are an estimated 71,991 centenarians in the United States on Dec. 1, 2010.

    Source: U.S. Census Bureau: Population estimates

  • There will be a projected 601,000 centenarians in the United States in 2050.

    Source: U.S. Census Bureau: Population projections

  • The incidence of disability increases with age. In 2006, some type of disability including blindness, hearing loss, arthritis, Alzheimer’s disease, etc., was reported by 37% of older Americans. This increased to 56% of Americans ages 80 and over.

    Source: Administration on Aging

  • Persons reaching age 65 have an average life expectancy of an additional 18.6 years (19.9 years for females and 17.2 years for males).

    Source: Administration on Aging

  • About 30% (11.3 million) of non-institutionalized older persons live alone (8.3 million women, 3.0 million men).

    Source: Administration on Aging

  • The population 65 and over will increase from 35 million in 2000 to 40 million in 2010 (a 15% increase) and then to 55 million in 2020 (a 36% increase for that decade).

    Source: Administration on Aging

  • The 85+ population is projected to increase from 4.2 million in 2000 to 5.7 million in 2010 (a 36% increase) and then to 6.6 million in 2020 (a 15% increase for that decade).

    Source: Administration on Aging

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